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Holistic Care for a Healthy Heart

Holistic Care for a Healthy Heart

holistic-heart-blog

Our hearts are a vital and central organ in our health and hold the power and capacity for us to live to our fullest. The heart pumps blood, the waters of our existence, throughout the body delivering vital nutrients and oxygen to all parts for optimal function. It also picks up waste matter to be delivered to the proper body stations for transformation or elimination. It is imperative that we have, and give ourselves, the finest care for our hearts.

The first step to a healthier heart is in our diets. Alcohol, tobacco, fast foods, and other toxins should be eliminated from the diet, or modified if a healthier choice exists. An example of healthy modification would be red wine (alcohol). High in resveratrol, it has been proven to reduce the risk of heart disease because of its antioxidant content. Other antioxidants that destroy free radicals (that tamper with heart health) can be found in fruits and vegetables, nuts, seeds and grains. The more colors you digest, the larger the spectrum of different antioxidants you are consuming. So eat as brightly as possible to brighten your heart health.

Here are a few more heart healthy tips.

  • Table salts are highly toxic and may cause or contribute to high blood pressure. However natural sea salts and mountain salts, such as Himalayan salt, hold high amounts of minerals which aid in good heart health and normal heart rhythm.
  • Nuts such as coconut, almonds and walnuts contribute to cholesterol health and walnuts in particular can also help remove plaque from arteries.
  • Some spices and herbs can assist heart health by thinning the blood which is helpful in lowering high blood pressure, a cause of added stress to the heart. A few examples are hawthorn berry, garlic, willow bark, turmeric and cayenne.
  • Besides the herbs and spices, some supplements such as CoQ10, chlorophyll (which helps deliver iron and oxygen to the cells), aerobic oxygen, cell food, iron, and minerals might be added for heart health if your diet is inadequate and extra nutrients are required.
  • If you are a meat eater then use olive oil along with your meat preparation to help break down the bad fats before consumption.
  • The heart chakra is about water. For heart health keep the body hydrated with the purest water available.

Remember that your heart is serving all the other organs. If the other organs are compromised then the heart has to work harder to maintain health and life. Nourish and cleanse accordingly and keep your whole body as fit as possible.

Meditation calms the heart into a peaceful rhythm. Quiet your mind of all disturbances. Find stillness within you and ask your waters to become smooth waves. Feel the peace it provides running through your veins into all organs and parts of you until you vibrate calmness and bliss.

Exercise is extremely important but there is a trend of doing so with added stress. Stress causes wear and tear on the heart so take some exercise time to play. A healthy heart is a playful and joyful heart. Let go of all stress and play like a healthy, carefree child. Act silly. Free your heart of the tensions that we believe are necessary for success. A playful heart will attract and ease others even in the most serious situations. Play will also release harsh emotions that may break the heart and will instead release endorphins which will lift the emotional heart.

Living life filled with love for all fills our hearts with the medicine it requires most.

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Susan Greenspan, Naturopath & Energetic Therapist

For a consultation, please contact Susan Greenspan at www.susan-greenspan.com. She will help you make the lifestyle changes needed to be a healthier you. For all your organic nutrition and supplements needs, please visit Healthtree at 3827 Saint Jean Blvd. in Dollard-des-Ormeaux or online at www.healthtree.ca.

Copyright © 2014, Susan Greenspan.

To learn more, visit our page Healthtree Professionals.